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Opening Press Conference

Opening Press Conference

“When I look back at some of the topics addressed here in past years it is obvious to me just how prescient the discussions have been. I fully anticipate that this year’s deliberations on subjects such as the dynamics of asymmetric war, the future of the Arab World and the role of NATO in Eastern Europe will be equally germane to us all.”
The Hon. Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence, Canada
 
“But we will not let the cowardly actions of a few change the fundamental nature of this country or the openness and civility that make Canada such a wonderful place in which to live and work.”
The Hon. Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence, Canada
 
“I am always impressed with the caliber of the delegates that this forum attracts from around the world. It is though the informal nature of the forum which allows attendees to exchange ideas frankly and openly as we search for constructive, thoughtful solutions to very complex problems.”
The Hon. Peter MacKay, Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Canada

 

Keynote Address

Keynote Address 

“It has been a difficult year in international security and the pursuit of peace. We meet in Halifax this weekend in the shadow of a very turbulent year internationally, and a terrorist attack here in Canada. This year we mark the 100th anniversary of the start of World War One and this month the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.”
Mr. Peter Van Praagh, President, Halifax International Security Forum
 
“The struggle for modernity—the fundamental struggle of the 20th century— is not yet won. So it continues.“
Mr. Peter Van Praagh, President, Halifax International Security Forum
 
“Nothing succeeds like success, and as the modern economies recover and generate wealth, they will again expand the greatest power that they have: the magnetic power to attract.”
Mr. Peter Van Praagh, President, Halifax International Security Forum

 

Opening Panel: Fortress North America: How Glorious? How Free?

Opening Panel 

“If there was any doubt about whether the (two recent) attacks on Canada were terrorist, ISIS has claimed responsibility for both attacks.”
Mr. Tom Clark, Chief Political Correspondent, Global News
 
“Threats against “Fortress America” exist well within the Fortress walls.”
Mr. Tom Clark, Chief Political Correspondent, Global News
 
“Probably, the thing that keeps me up at night is a no-notice attack.”
–Gen. Thomas Lawson, Chief of the Defence Staff, Canadian Armed Forces
 
“The distinction between “Away Game” and “Home Game” is becoming less assured.”
Gen. Charles Jacoby, Commander, United States Northern Command, North American Aerospace Defense Command
 
“I think we’re going to have to figure out similar mechanisms to support private agencies that are going to need help to support infrastructure like energy grids that people need.”
Gen. Charles Jacoby, Commander, United States Northern Command, North American Aerospace Defense Command
 
“There’s very little doubt about what the intent of ISIS is.”
The Hon. John McCain, Senator (R-AZ), United States
 
“We need to find a better word than “Fortress” …we have so much more to offer the world.”
The Hon. Tim Kaine, Senator (D-VA), United States
 
“It’s the transnational organized crime we’re after.”
Gen. Frank Grass, Chief, United States National Guard Bureau

 

Plenary 1: The Next Last Great War: The Battle for Modernity

Plenary 1 

“Democracy is not just raising hands and voting.” 
H.E. Toomas-Hendrik Ilves, President, Republic of Estonia
 
“Democracy has its own liberating influences.”
Mr. M.J. Akbar, Spokesperson, Bhartiya Janata Party 
 
“Democracy is not the right to talk sense; democracy is the right to talk nonsense.”
Mr. M.J. Akbar, Spokesperson, Bhartiya Janata Party
 
“The cold war, where countries were considering mutually assured destruction, was a stabilizing force because each country was more careful.”
H.E. Ehud Barak, Former Prime Minister and Former Minister of Defense, Israel
 
“We are living in a place where even America, the mightiest one, cannot solve the problems on its own”
H.E. Ehud Barak, Former Prime Minister and Former Minister of Defense, Israel
 
“You cannot say modernity for everyone with one brush”
MrMohammed Abulahoum, Head, Justice and Building Party, Yemen
 
“There is commitment all over the globe by the United States by both military and civilian, working as partners with other nations. That will be our strength in addressing these challenges”
Adm. Cecil Haney, Commander, United States Strategic Command
 
 

Plenary 2: Is Winning Possible? The Laws and Lawlessness of Asymmetric War

 Plenary 2

“We define asymmetry as the process of thinking, organizing and acting differently in order to maximize your advantage to exploit an enemy’s weakness to gain the advantage.  And so that is what war is…So war by our definition is asymmetric. All war is asymmetric.”
Gen. David Perkins, Commanding General, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command
 
“Our strategy is to take all these components of war, the political part of it, the military part of it, the informational part of it, and have a series of dilemmas in figuring out in each case how you maintain a position of relative advantage constantly.  So there really is never an end to it and that’s why I think it’s appropriate to say winning is constant.  Winning.  It’s never done [finished].”
Gen. David Perkins, Commanding General, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command
 
“Firepower wins a battle.  National power wins at the strategic level.  So what we have to make sure – from the Army’s point of view, that we train and develop our leaders to understand all of the elements of national power, including coalitions, the political element, the economic element, all of the joint pieces.”
Gen. David Perkins, Commanding General, United States Army Training and Doctrine Command
 
“If we look to the world at the end of the 20th century and certainly the world in which we live today, what we call asymmetry is more about unconventional, and even more about unrestricted warfare.  I mean that we are facing straight adversaries, enemies, that are not complying, that are not accepting the world – the rules of the game.”
–Gen. Jean-Paul Paloméros, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation, North Atlantic Treaty
Organization
 
“We can win on the short term and lose on the long term and vice versa.  I would argue that in the Balkans we lost – we lost a lot when we accepted the overrun of safe areas.”
–Gen. Jean-Paul Paloméros, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
 
“The Afghan forces are doing better and better every day.  They are gaining skills. They are courageous. They are committing themselves.  And we see the transition coming.  So let’s commit ourselves for the result, support mission, training, advice, assist.  That could be the most wonderful success of one coalition for many, many years and it is really worthy because the alternative is terrible.”
–Gen. Jean-Paul Paloméros, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
 
“Can we afford to lose, because this is not just a battle far away?  This is a battle that comes all the way back home, including here in Canada.”
–Ms. Lyse Doucet, Chief International Correspondent, BBC
 
“The strategy is there but it has to be more clear.  The vision has to be clarified.  Air strikes alone cannot win the war.  They are effective.  They are helpful but you have to have troops on the ground.”
–The Hon. Falah Mustafa Bakir, Head of Foreign Relations Department, Kurdistan Regional Government
 
“For us, winning should be creating the conditions where we can support the countries to develop their economy, to develop their democracy, actually to stabilize them.  But these conditions need to be met by degrading the offensive posture of the non-state actors, like ISIL and others.”
–Mr. Irakli Alsania, Former Minister of Defense, Georgia
 
“War is the extension of politics and it’s the tools of politics and of course we need to deal with things militarily but at the same time, creating the environment for reconciliation only can be done through community interactions. Just one last point I want to make is that we have to be consistent.  We have to learn from our own past mistakes.”
–Mr. Irakli Alsania, Former Minister of Defense, Georgia
 
“We tend to look at the world because we have an expeditionary element to how we operate and we bring – we try and bring effective responses outside of our countries to other countries and therefore we tend to internalize and own the problem when in fact much of the asymmetry stems from – whether it’s the politics or the nature of the – the very nature of the conflict itself.  It is owned by somebody else. So we can sit here and try and wrestle with means to alter the situation in Syria but ultimately much of the asymmetry is generated and created by the very nature of the conflict inside that country.  And so to come from the outside and go in, to try and put a solution in place just adds to the overall asymmetrical effect.”
 –Mr. Vance Serchuk, Adjunct Senior Fellow, Center for a New American Security
 
“The Arab Spring and the revolutions were hijacked.  The uprising started but there was no leadership to lead and to bring it about to the safe side.  Therefore, they were hijacked by the Islamists who took control and created a lot of sensitivities and nervousness.”
–The Hon. Falah Mustafa Bakir, Head of Foreign Relations Department, Kurdistan Regional Government
 

 

Plenary 3: Who Controls the Map? Lost Innocents, Persistent Criminals, Depraved Innocents

Plenary 3

“Those of us who believe in nation states and the pluralism that can and should exist within nation states have a responsibility to ensure that these free actors, these ones who will challenge the nation state, don’t get their way and there are a number of ways we can do that. We can do it within our own borders and we can do it with international cooperation but it’s something that we have to do.”
– The Hon. Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence, Canada
 
“The way to fight (the drug trade) is to reduce the drug demand in the United States, in Canada and the rest of the world. The amount of money that is generated by drug consumption primarily in the west fuels unbelievable levels of violence throughout the world. But certainly in Central America and other parts of the Americas and Caribbean, just cocaine alone, the profit that comes out of the United States, cocaine alone is about 80 billion dollars a year.”
– Gen. John Kelly, Commander, United States Southern Command
 
“Russia still enjoys the status of a state, enjoys the benefits of the international system but at the same time it’s using non-state actors to actively destabilize a neighboring country.”
– The Hon. Alexander Vershbow, Deputy Secretary General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
 
“There is no one size fits all. We have to understand whether it is in Iraq, Kurdistan or whether it is in Ukraine and Russia, the history is what brought about the crashes. …there is no one criteria. The only advice one can give to policymakers is before you make decisions, whether it is of intervention or non-intervention. Where they are looking for your allies and trying to find your enemy, know a little but about the history of the region.”
– Dr. Shlomo Avineri, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 
“We all know the history. And it will continue to expand and morph for probably decades and decades to come. I mean this will be a very, very long war and no one in this room, in my opinion, will be alive at the end of this war. We will win it so long as we stay true to our values and our likeminded, decent people gather together and do what needs to be done.”
– Gen. John Kelly, Commander, United States Southern Command
 
“Israel is a nation state that was fighting an organization, whether you call it terrorist or not, it was fighting an organization that was not fighting or playing by the rule of international law … they are first cousins of the same phenomenon. It is a non-state organization that shields itself behind women and children, occasionally behind international law, which it of itself is not committed to so this is one of the problems Israel is suffering from.”
– Dr. Shlomo Avineri, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
 
“I think also the viability of a solution is building up local forces who can fight for their own countries, fight for their own more moderate ideologies to counter the toxic ideologies of groups like ISIL and also building up institutions of local governments.”
– The Hon. Alexander Vershbow, Deputy Secretary General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
 
“I am a strong partisan for NATO enlargement, and I still believe that we have to uphold that vision and not be intimidated by Russian efforts to draw red lines and to re-establish the sphere of influence in their neighborhood.”
– The Hon. Alexander Vershbow, Deputy Secretary General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
 
“The globalization of all these different types of crime is a factor that we have to deal with and those of us in the nation states have to ensure that number one, we have that global cooperation with those who are likeminded individuals and countries, and ensure that our laws keep pace with what is actually happening in this world.”
– The Hon. Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence, Canada
 
“Everything I have done in my career, on the battlefield or right now, what I do now in Southern Command, everything I have done has begun and ended with human rights.”
– Gen. John Kelly, Commander, United States Southern Command
 
 

Plenary 4: O Say Can’t You See? The Indispensable Role of the Exceptional Superpower

Plenary 4

“On the issue of national security, during the Cold War, we were always in the scenario of a nuclear exchange.  So, we were always in great danger but I have never seen the world in greater disarray and a failure of American leadership throughout.”
The Hon. John McCain, Senator (R-AZ), United States
 
“I guarantee you, that if we had left a sustainable force behind (in Afghanistan), that a situation would be different and I’ll tell you again what I’ve been saying ever since the President announced it, unless we leave a sustaining force behind in Afghanistan, we’re going to see the same movie.  And, that’s really watching — it’s like watching a train wreck as we did in Iraq.”
The Hon. John McCain, Senator (R-AZ), United States
 
“We’re projecting our values, religious tolerance, press freedom, gender equality, equality for folks regardless of sexual orientation in ways they’re affecting the rest of the world. When there’s humanitarian crisis like Ebola, we all work together, but it’s US soldiers and personnel that are over in Africa trying to fight it off, people want us. Magnanimity go back to Aristotle, the pinnacle character of virtue of a person or of a society, is Magnanimity.  It’s a hard concept to understand.”   
–The Hon. Tim Kaine, Senator (D-VA), United States
 
“I want to replace indispensable with exemplary.  We should try to be the exemplary nation and exemplary nation and if we are, we’re much more likely to be indispensable.  But, if you try to be the indispensable nation, you’re much more likely to blunder in to situations where maybe you — others are better suited or coalitions are better suited or maybe you shouldn’t be there at all.  Let’s be exemplary.”
–The Hon. Tim Kaine, Senator (D-VA), United States

 

 

Plenary 5: Get Smart: Gaining Intelligence, Missing the Meaning

Plenary 5

“The complexities that we are dealing with continues to grow in significant ways … when I started my journey as an intelligence professional … fast-forward 28 years to today, the level the complexity, the breadth is mind-blowing to me. … On the large number of partnerships and relationships that are foundational to the future, because as this expectation of knowledge grows for you, the places you have to go to get that information, the partners you need to help you, they also grow.  So the complexity of the people and organizations that you are dealing with are just amazing to me.”
–Adm. Mike Rogers, Commander, United States Cyber Command; Director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service
 
“We have to rethink this. When two massive intelligence failures happen in the US – one was called 9/11 and another one was call the national intelligence estimate on Iraq – we rethought the organization of our intelligence community. … we passed, in 2004, an Intelligence Reform Act.  … It’s 10 years after that, and I would argue that we have to rethink it again. It’s not just about moving boxes, but about assessing the threats against us now.”
The Hon. Jane Harman, Director, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Woodrow Wilson International Center Scholars
 
“The cumbersome nature now of our intelligence infrastructure becoming so big and unwieldy, and to be able to sort through the various sources that are coming in often in straws… What I think is successful in acting on actionable intelligence is best when it is fused, not fudged, but fused.”
Min. Peter MacKay, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
 
“Some of what we need to examine is right there in plain view and that has to be fused with the intelligence – human intelligence, signals intelligence.”
Min. Peter MacKay, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
 
“I would argue that open source information is more useful now than much of our human intelligence …data-mining of open sources and building profiles on people may be the best intelligence we have.”
The Hon. Jane Harman, Director, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Woodrow Wilson International Center Scholars
 
“We have to constantly keep our eye on public confidence and being able to command that respect from the people we represent.  We cannot compromise our values while professing to protect them. The rule of law is a very important backdrop.”
Min. Peter MacKay, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada
 
“Sometimes the most effective stuff you do isn’t the cloak and dagger black operations, sometimes its something as simple as … open-source information.  US government, law enforcement and intelligence is hamstrung – they can’t easily look at it.  There are legal restrictions and rules that prevent them. That’s not true of the private sector.”
–The Hon. Frances Townsend, Executive Vice President for Worldwide Government, Legal, and Business Affairs, MacAndrews and Forbes Holdings, Inc.
 
“Risk has never been greater and trust has never been lower … We have got to overcome that.  If we compromise who we are and what we are in the name of security, they have won. I think we can maintain security without compromising our freedom. A world of amazing freedom with limited security isn’t in our best interest, just like a world with amazing security and limited freedom–I don’t think we want that either.”
–Adm. Mike Rogers, Commander, United States Cyber Command; Director, National Security Agency/Chief, Central Security Service
 
“Security and liberty are not a zero-sum game.”
The Hon. Jane Harman, Director, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Woodrow Wilson International Center Scholars
 
“This is an ideological war, and we have to get good at it. … We have to get very good at propaganda again.”
– Baroness Pauline Neville-Jones, Prime Minister’s Special Representative to Business on Cybersecurity House of Lords, United Kingdom
 
 

Plenary 6: Africa Breaking Out

Plenary 6

“There is always a risk in the way we look at Africa. It’s almost seasonal. It goes from the bad news story to the good news story … It tends to become a very un-nuanced and a very binary approach to what’s going on in Africa, which is a vastly complex continent.”
-Ms. Karin Landgren, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Liberia, United Nations
 
“Africa is rising. I do not deny that things are working positively on the continent. I like to see Africa as a plane that has taken flight, which is a good thing and no accident. It’s moving but that plane took off without the majority of the people. So we have the majority of the people still on the ground; there has to be a discipline of development. Some of the people are going to be very, very angry and would like to take the plane down. That’s why we have Al-Shabab, that’s why we have Boko Haram. I think for Africa to truly breakout we have to understand the fact that this plane has to come back to the ground to pick up these other people before it gets to its destination.”
– Mr. Japheth Omojuwa, Editor, AfricanLiberty.org
 
“For me the topic of ‘Africa Breaking Out’ conjures the imagery of this continent that is trying to recast its honor relative to the rest of the world in the 21st century. How does Africa break out of the stereotyping that has happened in the past in regards to the continent?”
– Dr. Christopher Fomunyoh, Senior Associate and Regional Director for Central and West Africa, National Democratic Institute
 
“I think there really needs to be a genuine conversation within the international community when it comes to putting in place the infrastructure to sustain peacekeeping and peace building in African countries and then preparing the countries for competitive elections.”
– Dr. Christopher Fomunyoh, Senior Associate and Regional Director for Central and West Africa, National Democratic Institute
 
“Ebola has exposed that rebuilding a country is not just about building the military and the police, and we don’t even do that well. Rebuilding the country requires you to look at the social contract of a country–the bit that the international community can’t do well because it requires intimate long term engagement that doesn’t allow you to just “check the boxes.”
– Dr. Comfort Ero, Program Director, Africa, International Crisis Group
 
“The Nigerian government has done a great job of connecting farmers through mobile phones, some 11 million farmers to their mobile phones. In the past it used to be that they would have to go to middlemen to assess opportunities from the government, now they can actually directly access loans, essential services and it’s actually having a massive effect in the sector. In 1998 there were about 112 million Nigerians and 400,000 mobile phones. Today there are over a 100 million mobile phones in Nigeria and 169 million Nigerians.”
-Mr. Japheth Omojuwa, Editor, AfricanLiberty.org
 
 

Plenary 7: Wanted: Food, Energy, Water – A FEW Good Resources 

Plenary 7

“There are multiple challenges ahead, multiple investments to be made. … There is plenty of room for more work on energy efficiency …  But I think as far as energy is concerned, I think there is plenty of room for optimism despite all the hard work that needs to be done.”
Mr. Vladimir Milov, President, Institute of Energy Policy
 
“The paradox is that if you make energy systems more efficient, society will consume more energy.  And that is a well-documented thing.  So energy efficiency on its own is not a sufficient response to sustainability issues.” 
Mr. Peter Tertzakian, Chief Energy Economist & Managing Director, ARC Financial Corporation
  
“Every time in the history of energy, when you butt up against unsustainable issues, there are three factors that dictate it, and it is not any one of these factors, it’s the collusion of these factors; they are always the same. It’s environmental degradation, geopolitics and population growth, wealth, creation and excessive demand on resources and also combined with scarcity of the resources that you are using.  And during these periods …what you have are periods of a lot of turmoil, turbulence; geopolitical issues become exacerbated. … I am actually technologically an optimist: that technology can take us much further than it has in the past …but in the near term, I am quite concerned about the geopolitical angle.  The global geopolitical situation … is nothing short of ugly and that is curtailing investments.”
– Mr. Peter Tertzakian, Chief Energy Economist & Managing Director, ARC Financial Corporation
 
“If you take a look at the recent non-conventional boom in the oil and gas, it was pretty much driven by private initiative and to a large extent by smaller and medium sized companies without direct government interference. This is why my best advice to governments, if you want to non- conventional boom to continue: stay out of it.”
Mr. Vladimir Milov, President, Institute of Energy Policy
 
“The free market has a very powerful way of fostering innovation, and we are in this period where we are seeing dramatic innovation in things like drilling completions, the ability to bring more oil and gas to surface at lower and lower costs.”  
Mr. Peter Tertzakian, Chief Energy Economist & Managing Director, ARC Financial Corporation
  
“Nobody actually looks at themselves in the mirror and says, ‘Actually it is our collective responsibility,’ because there is a big difference between conservation and energy efficiency. Conservation means being mindful about when you turn the lights on and off or what kind of vehicle you drive … and I think that the public is shirking responsibility. I think the governments have a responsibility to educate people. 75% of omissions are generated in the oil supply chain by driving vehicles.  You talk about the oil sands, and it gets a bad rap and it is only like 10% of the omissions. The bulk of the omissions are in the habits of the people that use this stuff.”
Mr. Peter Tertzakian, Chief Energy Economist & Managing Director, ARC Financial Corporation
 
“When we look at mass migration starting because of lack of food, lack of water, there are going to be neighboring countries that might not be able to absorb a mass migration and so the instability…we generally think about security in terms of potential conflict between nations but a lack of resource can be just as much the source of the conflict.”  
– Adm. Michelle Howard, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, United States Navy;
 
“Last year was the first year in history in which more people around the world died from over-consumption of food and disease related to over consumption of food than from starvation or lack of food – so much for the world it running out of food.  The problem of food has to do with management and distribution. Natural gas ties into food, energy.”
Dr. Gal Luft, Co-Director, Institute for the Analysis of Global Security
 
“If you look at the OECD countries, the 28 wealthiest countries in the world, the energy consumption has flattened out, and many countries, including Germany, are in decline.  So it can be done; it does take willingness on the part of the people, combined with policy, combined with recognizing you are making a big mess, which is one of the catalysts I mentioned. Environmental degredation is something that catalyzes a breaking point.”
Mr. Peter Tertzakian, Chief Energy Economist & Managing Director, ARC Financial Corporation
 
“We have to stop thinking about renewables as a substitute to the big three: oil, gas, and coal, which dominate the energy balance and something that will be replaced with solar wind, whatever which would play similar roles.  We have got to think about renewables as filling very specific niches, maybe not too large, like geothermal best fits for energy supply of remote north regions. Municipal waste is very good at providing energy for cities, wind and solar is very good sources for individual homes and rural areas, and so on.  We have got to think about renewables for their specific niches and purposes, and this is why we can make them best fit into global development.”
Mr. Vladimir Milov, President, Institute of Energy Policy
 
 

Plenary 8: The New Propagandists: The Battle for the Narrative 

Plenary 8

“Those who contravene the law or commit violence have to face the full force of the law.”
The Hon. Steven Blaney, Minister of Public Safety, Canada
 
“They call themselves ‘Twitter Jihadis.’  There are cells on the internet that distribute the propaganda and in real time – it was Thursday or Friday in the battle of Ramadi, they were distributing videos of the fight there. They were reporting on the weather and the way the weather impeded the coalition actions to have air support to Iraqi forces.  …the Counter Extremism Project goes out, tries to identify those individuals who are disseminating the propaganda.” 
–The Hon. Frances Townsend, Executive Vice President for Worldwide Government, Legal, and Business Affairs,  MacAndrews and Forbes Holdings, Inc.
 
“You also have to look at the underlying situation. Some of these populations are receptive to the ISIS narrative because of either the sheer dominance of Iraq or various problems that the people have in other parts of the Middle East.  So you have to also deal with the underlying situation. You cannot just win this through marketing alone.  I think that you have to also address a lot of other bigger picture issues.” 
 – Mr. Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO, Moby Grou
 
“The unifying principle here is that, whether you’re talking about Russia or you’re talking about ISIS, we have to know that this [the narrative] is a battle space, just like physical battle space.  And we must not permit it to be uncontested.” 
–The Hon. Frances Townsend, Executive Vice President for Worldwide Government, Legal, and Business Affairs, MacAndrews and Forbes Holdings, Inc.
 
“I think we have to get to the core.  We can express ideas.  We are a democracy.  We can have these debates in a free and open environment…But the bottom line is if you are willing to use violence, attack a symbol of a government and contravene the law and do it and purposely for an extremist or ideology, this is terrorism and our nation has to send a strong signal that this is not the Canadian way.”
The Hon. Steven Blaney, Minister of Public Safety, Canada
 
“You have to have multiple efforts.  You have to delegitimize, deglamourize ISIS and what they’re doing. You have to shame them.  You have to see doubt … attempt to fragment the organization.  But even before that, you have to address why these young people are attracted to ISIS.” 
Mr. Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO, Moby Group
 
“Russian propaganda works at the moment.  And in fact, just the psychological poll shows that more than 80% support Putin’s policy vis-à-vis Ukraine, and Ukraine in particular.  But that’s the issue of propaganda because we in Russia don’t have free media at all.  We don’t have any single free media … this intensive propaganda … is effective and it works, not only for Russian population, but also abroad.”   
– H.E. Mikhail Kaysanov, Former Prime Minister of Russia, Co-Leader, Republican Party of People’s Freedom
 
“Definitely we can do something … to create a flow of information.  I think just for the United States, it’s important to keep funding of all those channels, like Radio Liberty and others, and potentially to be engaged more with the Russian civil society organizations which can distribute information through social media…  What they can do just to support truth.  True information.  That is the most important thing. … the most awful thing that could happen is if just the West would give up on Russia: close their eyes.” 
– H.E. Mikhail Kaysanov, Former Prime Minister of Russia, Co-Leader, Republican Party of People’s Freedom
 
“I think the single most important thing we need to discuss as Muslims is what does Islam represent? To characterize this. People talk about moderate Muslims.  Who are we?  And what do we believe in?  The debate needs to come from the Islamic countries, and I think this is very serious, that we need to actually look within and to ask ourselves as to what we believe in.”  
Mr. Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO, Moby Group
 
“It’s difficult for a foreign government, which is not Muslim, to define what it means to be a Muslim.  That’s why I think it has to develop from within.  It needs to be debated.  I think we need to have some debates over the next few years.  It needs to be discussed.  We need to have forums.  It needs to be encouraged.”
Mr. Saad Mohseni, Chairman and CEO, Moby Group

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